pie languages

A children’s game (It’s not child’s play): “Erbsensprache” or Pea language, lingua do i and other language games

In part one of this series, I introduced you to constructed languages (conlang) and in part two, planned languages. Now I’ll conclude with languages games, also called ludling in English: In a playful way, children, but also adults change an existing language according to predefined rules. The result is a kind of secret language that…

A single universal language for everyone? Artificial Languages, Part 2

In the first part of this short series on artistic languages we focussed on constructed languages (conlangs). Planned languages, previously also called international auxiliary languages, represent another large section. Their history goes back to the seventeenth century when scholars and philosophers, such as Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, developed so-called a priori languages. These were strictly logical…

Artificial Languages and Planned Languages

Part 1: Extra-terrestrial and indigenous peoples All languages that are not natural languages – in other words, they have not developed historically and are spoken (or expressed in gestures) by people – are known in linguistics as artificial languages or constructed languages. This includes planned languages such as Esperanto, fictional languages such as Klingon from…

Language learning (reading) made easy: the EuroCom method – part 1

submarine, président, acção, problemă – we can understand lots of English and French words, even Portuguese and Romanian ones, without having actually studied those languages properly. The examples above all belong to the vocabulary of the Romance family of languages, although there are equivalents in the Germanic and Slavic languages. Look at the example below,…

Anatomy and emotions

We often use metaphors or figures of speech to express our emotions: for example, love is located in the heart … but is this really true for all languages? Farsi is a good example that this assignment of emotions to certain parts of our body isn’t as universal as it seems: „to jigare mani“ means…